General Information

Video clip from ActionNewsJax.com about lost mobility fee funding, due to last year’s one year moratorium. Depsite Jacksonville being the 3rd most deadly city in the country for pedestrians, and funding for capital improvement projects dwindling, the Jacksonville City Council is considering giving up millions more through the approval of a three year mobility fee moratorium.

City council district map that also illustrates the location of each mobility zone.

At-Large city council district map that also illustrates the location of each mobility zone.

  1. Mobility Fees waived to date is $4,768,881 for 38 projects;

  2. Last day for an eligible Mobility Fee Certificate holder to apply for the fee waiver is April 19, 2013 (Note: The eligibility period for a mobility fee certificate holder is 6-months from its issuance date;

  3. Amount of Mobility Fees collected prior to the moratorium: $60,760.00 for one (1) project. Note: The moratorium was implemented approximately one (1) month after the Mobility Fee Ordinance was enacted on September 19, 2011;

  4. Total Mobility Fees collected since the expiration of the mobility fee waiver ordinance (2011-516) on October 19, 2011(the last day to submit a mobility fee application): $10,182.00 for three (3) projects;

  5. Amount of Fair Share Assessment Fees collected for the 12 month period preceding the implementation of the mobility fee ordinance (September 19, 2010 thru September 19, 2011): $3,779,906.00 for eleven (11) projects;

  6. Amount of Fair Share Assessment Fees collected to date during the waiver period: $185,204 for four (4) projects.

source: City of Jacksonville

Next Page: Mobility Fees waived (lost) by zone and what they could have funded.

MOBILITY ZONE 1

Mobility fees already lost: $260,789.00

What that could have paid for: A 1.29 mile sidewalk on Philips Highway between I-95 and I-295 East Beltway. This would include making it possible to actually cross the intersection of Philips Highway and Southside Boulevard by something other than a car.

City council district map that also illustrates the location of each mobility zone.

At-Large city council district map that also illustrates the location of each mobility zone.

MOBILITY ZONE 2

Mobility fees already lost: $1,446,724.00

What that could have paid for: All City of Jacksonville Bicycle Master Plan Priority projects in Mobility Zone 2, totaling $1,239,409.41 in costs. Mentioned bicycle facilities would effectively connect the University of North Florida’s campus with the surrounding existing bicycle network (Kernan Boulevard multiuse trail and Town Center Parkway bike lanes).

City council district map that also illustrates the location of each mobility zone.

At-Large city council district map that also illustrates the location of each mobility zone.

MOBILITY ZONES 3 & 4

Mobility fees already lost: $564,301.00

What that could have paid for: Main Street forms the boundary between Mobility Zones 3 & 4. A potential joint project is a 4.68 mile, 12’ wide multiuse path between the Trout River Bridge and New Berlin Road. This project would effectively serve as a bicycle and pedestrian spine for North Jacksonville, making it possible to access destinations such as River City Marketplace, Imeson Industrial Park, and Shands North Jacksonville, on a path separated from high speed automobile and truck traffic. 1.57 miles (Trout River to Imeson Park Boulevard) or 33% of this project could have been funded with mobility fees lost by last year’s one year moratorium.

City council district map that also illustrates the location of each mobility zone.

At-Large city council district map that also illustrates the location of each mobility zone.

MOBILITY ZONE 5

Mobility fees already lost: $311,883.00

What that could have paid for: As a part of the 2030 Mobility Plan, the Baldwin Rail Trail would eventually become a connected part of the city’s overall bicycle network. $147,851.20 could have paid for an extension of the Baldwin Rail Trail, along Imeson Road, to Commonwealth Avenue.

City council district map that also illustrates the location of each mobility zone.

At-Large city council district map that also illustrates the location of each mobility zone.

MOBILITY ZONE 6

Mobility fees already lost: $663,324.00

What that could have paid for: A $306,520.79 bike lane project in the vicinity of Firetower Road and 103rd Street. This critical bike network connector would eventually become a part of a continuous bicycle corridor stretching from Oakleaf Town Center to Murray Hill (Normandy Mall), along Old Middleburg Road.

If all the eligible Mobility Fee Certificate holders successfully apply for mobility fee waivers, mobility fees in Zone 6 could balloon from $663,324 to nearly $9 million. That’s more than enough to fully fund Mobility 6’s second highest roadway priority, which is a $5.4 million project for ITS and intersection improvements along 103rd Street between I-295 and Old Middleburg Road.

City council district map that also illustrates the location of each mobility zone.

At-Large city council district map that also illustrates the location of each mobility zone.

MOBILITY ZONE 7

Mobility fees already lost: $922,941.00

What that could have paid for: Two critical context sensitive streets projects could have been funded in Mobility Zone 7 with the amount of fees already lost from last year’s one year moratorium on mobility fees. A project to add bike lanes on Edgewood Avenue from Avondale to Murray Hill’s Post Street is anticipated to cost $492,689.16. A similar project on San Juan Avenue, from Blanding Boulevard to Herschel Street is anticipated to cost $313,759.75. Both are essential elements to the revitalization of the Lake Shore and Murray Hill commercial districts.

City council district map that also illustrates the location of each mobility zone.

At-Large city council district map that also illustrates the location of each mobility zone.

MOBILITY ZONE 8

Mobility fees already lost: $251,414.00

What that could have paid for: The Arlington Expressway is one of Jacksonville’s most deadly corridors for pedestrians. The mobility plan would fund 2.33 miles of new sidewalk construction along the North Service Drive between Cesery Boulevard and Regency Square Mall, as well as a pedestrian overpass over the expressway. Over 61% of the 2.33 mile sidewalk project could have been designed and constructed with the mobility fees already lost for this zone. It’s quite possible that as much as $2.13 million could be lost from last year’s moratorium. Combined with potential fees generated in this district in 2013, we would already have the funds necessary to completely revamp the Arlington Expressway corridor from a bicycle and pedestrian standpoint.

City council district map that also illustrates the location of each mobility zone.

At-Large city council district map that also illustrates the location of each mobility zone.

MOBILITY ZONE 9

Mobility fees already lost: $337,396.00

What that could have paid for: This could have funded the construction of a multiuse path paralleling McCoys Creek from Myrtle Avenue to McDuff Avenue. Such a path would become an important urban core link of a corridor that would tie the Baldwin Trail with downtown and the S-Line Urban Greenway.

City council district map that also illustrates the location of each mobility zone.

At-Large city council district map that also illustrates the location of each mobility zone.

What Is The 2030 Mobility Plan and Fee?

The award winning 2030 Mobility Plan originated as a response to the 2009 Florida Community Renewal Act (Senate Bill 360), which required local governments to amend their local comprehensive plans to include “land use and transportation strategies to support and fund mobility, including alternative modes of transportation.” In addition, those strategies required the adoption of concepts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and promote energy-efficient land use patterns.

The Mobility Plan is intended to resolve multiple problems in Jacksonville. These include the need for safer streets, healthier neighborhoods, a fair “concurrency” system, and integrating transportation and land use development for fiscally sustainable growth patterns. The mobility fee serves as the funding source to implement these concepts. With Jacksonville’s revenue sources shrinking every year, the mobility fee provides the city with a fair path to invest in itself, stimulating job creation, quality of life enhancements, and economic growth in the process.

How You Can Get Involved

City of Jacksonville’s future needs its concerned resident’s will power more than ever. The mobility fee doesn’t stop development, it guides it. The total amount of a project’s mobility fee is strictly dependent on the will of the entity proposing the project. By taking advantage of the mobility fee’s credit adjustment system, mobility fees can already be eliminated or significantly reduced through site selection and site design. After all, it serving as a funding mechanism to change Jacksonville’s overall development form to one that is fiscally sustainable for the city, long term is the point of its existence in the first place.

A public hearing will be held on the proposed three year moratorium legislation on Tuesday, February 26, 2012. Attendance at the February 26th meeting will be important to speak for the importance of investing in Jacksonville’s future and letters of support from residents and organizations showing how the mobility plan will help their neighborhoods are also critical. Such grassroots efforts can be a powerful tool for the average resident who simply desires to live in a community with a higher quality-of-life.

• Mayor Alvin Brown’s Office 630-1776 mayorbrown@coj.net

• District 1 - Mobility Zones 2 & 8 - Clay Yarborough 630-1389 Clay@coj.net

• District 2 - Mobility Zones 2 & 8 - William Bishop 630-1392 WBishop@coj.net

• District 3 - Mobility Zone 2 - Richard Clark 630-1386 RClark@coj.net

• District 4 - Mobility Zones 1, 2, 8 & 10 - Don Redman 630-1394 Redman@coj.net

• District 5 - Mobility Zones 1 & 8 - Lori N. Boyer 630-1382 LBoyer@coj.net

• District 6 - Mobility Zone 1 - Matt Schellenberg 630-1388 MattS@coj.net

• District 7 - Mobility Zones 3, 4, 9 & 10 - Dr. Johnny Gaffney 630-1384 Gaffney@coj.net

• District 8 - Mobility Zones 4, 5 & 9 - E. Denise Lee 630-1385 EDLee@coj.net

• District 9 - Mobility Zones 7, 8, 9 & 10 - Warren Jones 630-1395 WAJones@coj.net

• District 10 - Mobility Zones 5, 6, 7 & 9 - Reggie Brown 630-1684 RBrown@coj.net

• District 11 - Mobility Zones 3, 4, 5 & 6 - Ray Holt 630-1383 Holt@coj.net

• District 12 - Mobility Zones 5, 6 & 7 - Doyle Carter 630-1380 doylec@coj.net

• District 13 - Mobility Zones 1 & 2 - Bill Guilliford 630-1397 Gulliford@coj.net

• District 14 - Mobility Zones 6 & 7 - Jim Love 630-1390 JimLove@coj.net

• At Large 1 - Mobility Zones 3, 4, 5, 6 & 7 - Kimberly Daniels 630-1393 KimDaniels@coj.net

• At Large 2 - Mobility Zones 2 & 8 - John R. Crescimbeni 630-1381 JRC@coj.net

• At Large 3 - Mobility Zones 1 & 2 - Stephen Joost 630-1396 Joost@coj.net

• At Large 4 - Mobility Zones 1, 7, 8 & 10 - Greg Anderson 630-1398 GAnderson@coj.net

• At Large 5 - Mobility Zones 4, 7, 9 & 10 - Robin Lumb 630-1387 RLumb@coj.net

Article by Ennis Davis. Contact Ennis at edavis@moderncities.com